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Cassington

Last Updated 01 July 2013 23:42

Image 1 for Cassington

History

Cassington is a small village of about 800 inhabitants about 5 miles (8.0 km) northwest of Oxford and sits at the eastern edge of the Oxfordshire Cotswolds where the River Evenlode joins the Thames.

The surrounding area has been continuously inhabited since at least the beginning of the Bronze Age and is rich in archaeological deposits dating back some four thousand years. The remains of an old Roman settlement can still be seen on slightly raised ground in the modern flood plain at the edge of the village.

Saxon settlers cleared away the woodland which formerly covered the whole of this area. Cassington's name comes from the Anglo-Saxon 'caersentun' meaning 'tun where cress grows' and the village is also mentioned in the Domesday survey of 1086 as Cersetone.

The parish includes the hamlet of Worton northeast of the village and the site of the former hamlet of Somerford to the south. Somerford seems to have been abandoned early in the 14th century.

The village contains two village greens, two classic English pubs, the Red Lion and the Chequers Inn, a primary school and St Peters Church, which is a Norman church founded in the 12th century by Geoffrey de Clinton.

Web : Cassington History